Cornwall & South West Fruit Focus (7)  Fruit – Health – Education Devonport Guild Hall 29th October 10 am – 5 pm

Cornwall & South West Fruit Focus (7)  

Fruit – Health – Education  

Devonport Guild Hall, Ker Street, Plymouth, Devon, PL1 4EL

Thursday 29th October from 9.30 a.m. for a 10 am start till 5pm.

Free Event   – with a charge for lunch and tea for those wanting these.

 

For those who want lunch or tea and coffee during the day there is a charge :-

£6-00 for Lunch   *(vegetarian/non vegetarian filled roles and salad)

£5-00 for tea or coffee during the day.

* Please let me know if you want lunch preferably by 16th October.

* There is also food available from the in house bakery and you can bring along your own lunch.

We also welcome any fruit based desserts/cakes etc. (cold/ambient) – or desserts made from a favorite fruit or local source of fruit to share and compare at lunchtime. Even better if you can bring along an example of the fruit and share the recipe. Please let me know if this is of interest.

There is parking around the Guildhall in Kerr Street and some small free car parks nearby. I am also looking into additional parking if we need it.   Devonport has a railway station but trains are less frequent than the main station.     There is a regular bus service to Devonport Guild Hall from the station (including City Bus 21, 21A and First bus 3  stop in Cumberland Road)

For booking and more information contact Andrew Ormerod at alchemy_360(at)hotmail.co.uk For any queries leave your phone number & I will contact you.

Also visit Word Press Blog     Cornwall & South West Fruit Focus.

Or Face Book – Cornwall & SW Fruit focus

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We hope to make some of the presentations fairly interactive with the audience to make the day as fun and informative as possible.  There may be a chance for tasting tests in two of the talks.

So what is healthy about fruit?   

How do fruit and veg compare?

What form should we consume fruit in?

Are some fruit healthier than others?

How do we perceive taste – does it vary with the crop, the growing conditions or our taste?

Are there ways of getting the people who are missing out excited about eating fruit?

What can growers produce that might be niche and have links to health research?

Local and niche fruit what lessons can be learnt in relation to marketing?

What’s the story behind the people who produced our fruit – what benefits can we make as consumers to their livelihoods?

Are there entrepreneurial opportunities linked to fruit production?

Are there things that we can learn from the past in relation to local production and supply in Plymouth and it’s hinterland?

How does fruit fit into education?   An overview.  

We hope to review some of the initiatives linked to education and fruit – be it informal or formal that are going on today from different parts of the world and any problems or gaps that might be present.

Soapbox session there is a chance for you the audience to chip in your ideas linked to Fruit – Health – Education.

To sum areas of interest associated with the event.  
1,  Concerns about engaging children up to the age of 11 into the fruit and vegetable eating habit. 
 –   Review of Food Dudes work.
2,  Attraction of fruit and vegetables cannot be gauged by measuring compounds in food plants alone
variation also depends on our genetic make up and our eating habits.
3, How we taste will be reviewed with audience participation.
4, A review of what form fruit is in when eaten will hopefully be covered.  And how fruit and vegetables compare.
5,  We review health information linked to trials linked to soft fruit.
6,  We review niche soft fruit possibilities that could be considered in Cornwall & the South West.  
7,  We consider the market potential of niche/local produce.  
8,  We consider the value of the stories behind the products – associated with the products and the communities who produce them.  This is related in stories related to a number of mixer drinks for different community groups. 
9,  There will be a chance to taste some of the mixers at lunchtime.  
10, Considering niche fruit associated with local provenance and potential added value – catering students will demonstrate what can be done with the more interesting local varieties of fruit. 
11, We welcome a chance for people to bring in a fruit based desserts or cakes (for example containing a favourite local fruit) to be tasted at lunchtime – may be we can award a prize for the most original entry.  
12,  We have a review of links between fruit and education (formal and informal)
13,  We have an overview of a commercial training orchard from Kent and its role in training horticulture students and school groups.  
14,  We have a review of the food infrastructure (particularly fruit) between Devonport – the navy and the hinterland of the Tamar Valley.  Hopefully we can contextualise this with the situation today.  
15,  Soap box session for any points attendees wish to raise.  
Of interest to nutritionalists, food producers, growers and people involved in education. – who may be on half term vacation.

Speakers

Carol Wagstaff – Associate Professor in Crop Quality for Health and Director of the Food Advanced Training Partnership at the University of Reading.

“Bittersweet science: working at the dietary interface”

http://www.reading.ac.uk/food/about/staff/c-wagstaff.aspx

Gordon McDougall – (Senior Research Scientist, Environmental and Biochemical Sciences) and Rex Brennan (Leader of soft fruit breeding group). James Hutton Research Institute.

“Berries, Health and Believability” Via video conference

http://archive.northsearegion.eu/files/repository/20140106121015_2013-UK-Enclosure35.pdf

 

George Beech – Mudwalls Farm produce   Grower/supplier.

Advice on marketing local and niche produce. Via SKYPE

http://www.mudwallsfarm.co.uk

 

Andrew Ormerod, Economic Botanist based in Cornwall.

“An overview of formal and informal initiatives linked to fruit education and health”

Stefan Jordan, Lecturer, Hadlow College.

“From Pip to Plate’ – roles of a modern commercial apple orchard in education”

http://hadlow.ac.uk/news-events/news/pip-to-plate/

 

Rutie Ballestas –Fruto del Espíritu (FdE) importer of exotic fruit products from Colombia

‘The story is the base ingredient of our marketing mix!”   http://www.fruto.co.uk/Welcome

 

James Crowden, Author and poet.

“Guzz…   Historic context of fruit production and trading around the Tamar, Devonport and the South West’.”. http://james-crowden.co.uk/index.php?&vmcchk=1&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=27

Carol Wagstaff – Associate Professor in Crop Quality for Health and Director of the Food Advanced Training Partnership at the University of Reading.

“Bittersweet science: working at the dietary interface”

The majority of consumers are aware that fruit and vegetables should form part of a healthy diet. However, compliance with government-driven messages such as “five-a-day” is very poor, with most people consuming just 2-3 portions of fruit or vegetables per day. There is a range of barriers to consumption including price, low availability of good quality produce, poor shelf life leading to food wastage and poor appearance and flavour. Consumers ‘buy with their eyes’ and if the product does not subsequently meet expectations of flavour and longevity it will not be repurchased.

The work of our research group therefore examines the interaction between plant genotype (i.e. variety), the environment in which it is produced (pre and postharvest) and how humans perceive the crop at the point of consumption. There are dangers of relying on phytochemical measurements of compounds in the crop as a reliable indicator of how it will taste and the talk will also explore the links between human genotype, how taste and flavour are perceived, and liking of different foods. The overarching aim of our work is to make fruit and vegetables more nutritionally dense at the point of consumption, looking and tasting attractive, and meeting consumer expectations of storage. People are then more likely to eat fruit and vegetables – making the right choice the easy choice.

Gordon McDougall – (Senior Research Scientist, Environmental and Biochemical Sciences) and Rex Brennan (Leader of soft fruit breeding group). James Hutton Research Institute.

“Berries, Health and Believability”

Berries come with a health halo – they are associated in our consciousness through folk-lore and legend with health. We will explore evidence for effects of berries on human health – the link between specific berry components and health. Mechanisms? How do they work? What about antioxidants?

The Hutton has a long established history in soft fruit breeding and we set the question “Can we beneficially alter the health properties of fruit – can we breed the next “super fruit”?

After the presentation, perhaps in the Q&A, we could address topics such as the use of available information on health in marketing of berries and berry products, berries with specific niches, berries for growing locally.

George Beech of Mudwalls Farm will highlight ways of marketing local niche products based on his experiences.

Andrew Ormerod, Economic Botanist based in Cornwall.

“An overview of formal and informal initiatives linked to fruit education and health”

Fruit production has been used associated with a range of formal and informal educational approaches covering a range of topics including health, plant sciences, production, growing and management from modern training orchards to agroforestry and forest gardens and cultural traditions linked to local varieties to informal learning spaces. I hope to illustrate a few examples.   In the introduction to the event I will mention a couple of pieces of work linked to getting children under 11 to eat more fruit and vegetables.

Stefan Jordan, Lecturer, Hadlow College.

“From Pip to Plate’ – roles of a modern commercial apple orchard in education”

Fruit and education based on a commercial training orchard and ‘From Seed to Plate’ school activities highlighting what science and production is involved in commercial apple production and possible opportunities for students in horticulture.   This is one of the “Huxley” training orchards, used to give college students experience of both the growing and fresh produce retailing and to encourage future generations of students to be interested in careers in horticulture. Stefan will also talk about the novel links to Hadlow Rural Community School and the school students involvement in ‘Hands on Horticulture’.

Rutie Ballestas   Fruto del Espiritu

‘The story is the base ingredient of our marketing mix!”

Fruto del Espíritu (FdE) began with a discovery of the wealth of biodiversity in Colombia: over 70 varieties of exotic fruit, many unknown in the UK. The marketing strategy is rooted in education, not only in educating the palate, but also in raising awareness.

 

The UK has been the largest cocaine consumer in Europe, yet few realized that their choices were financing an armed conflict, which has displaced over 5 million of the rural population.

In 2006 – 2010 Rutie worked with ‘Shared Responsibility’, a public awareness campaign by the Colombian government to promote alternative rural development. FdE developed a Schools and Youth Program including The Colombian Cocktail Challenge, inspiring thousands of young people to get very creative with lulo, mora and maracuyá. Some of our clients also created their own messages in some of London’s top cocktail bars.

Right now FdE is preparing the launch of Berraquera, a soft drink/cocktail mixer based on lulo in view of the Colombian’s goal to sign a Peace Agreement next March. As ever, the story is the base ingredient of our marketing mix!

James Crowden, author and poet.

“Guzz…   Historic context of fruit production and trading around the Tamar, Devonport and the South West’.”.

Guzz is the old naval slang word for Devonport. i.e. a good place for victualing and a guzzle.

Food production from the Tamar Valley and beyond played a vital role in support of the huge navy particularly in the early 19th century Napoleonic period navy and local apple (an important source of Vitamin C) were important for fighting scurvy. My great great grandmother was a regrator in Devonport, a broker who bought fruit from producer for the market. Originally there were three settlements that expanded dramatically a coalesced in the Plymouth area. Devonport was quite an affluent area during its past development – it and the productive hinterland have undergone large changes over the years.

Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 19.54.02 Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 20.13.03

Map of Devonport Guild Hall PL1 4EL

Program.

10.00 -10.10 Andrew Ormerod Introduction to the theme of Fruit & Health Timings Theme
10.10 – 10.50 Carol Wagstaff – Reading University Bittersweet science: working at the dietary interface 40 mins

(Allowing for public interaction)

10.50 –

11.30

Gordon Mc Dougall/Rex Brennen James Hutton Research Berries, Health and Believability 40 mins

Poss 25/15

Or 30/10 split.

11.30 -12.00 Coffee
12.00 –

12.30

Finding markets for niche fruit products 30 minutes
12.30

-13.10

Rutie Ballestas –Fruto del Espíritu The story is the base ingredient of our marketing mix 40 mins

(Allowing for public interaction)

13.10

-14.10

Lunch
14.10

-14.30

Andrew Ormerod – Economic Botanist An over view of initiatives linked to Fruit and Education examples from around the world 20 minutes
14.30

– 15.00

Stefan Jordan, Hadlow College ‘From Pip to Plate’ – roles of a modern commercial apple orchard in education 30 minutes
15.10

– 15.30

Coffee
15.30

-16.10

James Crowden, author and poet. Guzz…   Historic context of fruit production and trading around the Tamar, Devonport and the South West 40 minutes

Allowing for 10 minutes to contextualize

situation in Plymouth today

16.10 –

17.00

Soap Box Session

Short pieces on Fruit/health/education

From you the public – your views linked to fruit and health

Or fruit and education systems.

Also any one who wants to speak about their project or their concerns can do a short (few minutes) here.

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About cornucopiaalchemy

Dr. Andrew Ormerod has 14 years experience working as the Economic Botanist at the Eden Project - researching topical stories, artefacts, ethnobotanical inks, catering and retail links to exhibits. Previously I was involved with plant breeding and plant tissue culture working on a range of crops including winter cauliflowers, agricultural lupins, vining peas, wheat and barley and coconuts. I am now freelance and am interested in opportunities for lecturing; writing articles; consultancy linked to development of botanic gardens for crops based exhibits; supply chain work for unusual food or non-food crops with interesting stories about plants and people attached to them.
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